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Message From: jordan retro 11   |   Email Address: meahyira@gmail.com
Just as she did in her story collection, "Lips Touch: Three Times," Taylor tackles themes of longing and selfactualization with a sympathetic understanding of her audience. Who as a teenager didn't feel like a chimera, a mix of seemingly disparate parts forming an uncertain self?
Posted 10/13/2014

Message From: Christian Louboutin Mary Janes   |   Email Address: jxhwtzeurr@gmail.com
Posted: February 24, 2011NOTE: GMT is +5 hours ahead of Eastern Standard Time.DockingFebruary 24, 20111137 GMT....S-1/2 hold point. Distance: 24.2 miles (39 km) behind and 3.1 miles (5 km) below space station.1223 GMT....S1 hold point. Distance: 9.6 miles (15.5 km) behind and 3.1 miles (5 km) below space station.1309 GMT....S2 hold point arrival. Distance: 2.2 miles (3.5 km) behind space station. The ATV also reaches the same altitude as the space station.1309 - 1341 GMT....Turn on external lights; KURS activation; begin using relative GPS.1341 GMT....S2 hold point departure.1351 GMT....Orbital sunrise.1421 GMT....S3 hold point arrival. Distance: 817 feet (249 m) behind space station.1421 - 1500 GMT....Activate videometer and telegoniometer instruments; ATV-CC GO/NO-GO.1447 GMT....Orbital sunset.1500 GMT....S3 hold point departure.1522 GMT....Orbital sunrise.1523 GMT....S4 hold point arrival. Distance: 62 feet (19 m) behind space station.1523 - 1538 GMT....Pointing maneuver; ATV-CC GO/NO-GO.1538 GMT....S4 hold point departure.1540 GMT....S41 hold point arrival. Distance: 36 feet (11 m) behind space station.1540 - 1545 GMT....ATV-CC GO/NO-GO.1545 GMT....S41 hold point departure.1549 GMT....CAPTURE. Johannes Kepler's forward docking cone is captured by the aft port of the station's Zvezda service module.1619 GMT....Orbital sunset.Data source: ESAFinal Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is now available in our store. Get this piece of history!STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. Available in our store!Ares 1-X PatchThe official embroidered patch for the Ares 1-X rocket test flight, is available for purchase.Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.Project OrionThe Orion crew exploration vehicle is NASA's first new human spacecraft developed since the space shuttle a quarter-century earlier. The capsule is one of the key elements of returning astronauts to the Moon.Fallen Heroes Patch CollectionThe official patches from Apollo 1, the shuttle Challenger and Columbia crews are available in the store. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Commercial and military craft share a ride on Ariane 5 SPACEFLIGHT NOWPosted: October 1, 2009 Continuing an enviable string of success, the Ariane 5 team flew its fifth rocket of the year Thursday night topped with a high performance Spanish broadcasting satellite and a secure German military communications craft. Credit: Arianespace Liftoff into clear skies occurred precisely on time at 2159 GMT (5:59 p.m. EDT) from the Guiana Space Center on the northeastern shore of South America.The Ariane soared eastward on a powered flight lasting nearly 25 minutes to the targeted geosynchronous transfer orbit.After the cryogenic engine of the upper stage completed firing, the rocket performed a series of autonomous maneuvers to deploy Amazonas 2, a commercial telecommunications spacecraft to cover the Americas, and COMSATBw 1, an orbiting relay platform for the German Ministry of Defence."I think you have seen a perfect launch," Jean-Yves Le Gall, chairman and CEO of Arianespace, told his customers observing the flight in the control center. The Ariane achieved a highly elliptical orbit stretching 22,345 miles at its farthest point from Earth and 155 miles at the nearest. The satellites will use their onboard engines to circularize the orbit and reach geostationary slots, with Amazonas 2 planning three burns and COMSATBw 1 needing four maneuvers over the next several days. EADS Astrium built Amazonas 2 spacecraft using the Eurostar E3000 model offering. The 12,000-pound satellite is equipped with 54 Ku-band and 10 C-band transponders for communications services to North, Central and South America."Amazonas 2 is the most powerful satellite built by Astrium up to now," said Antonio Abad, the Amazonas 2 spacecraft mission director. An artist's concept of Amazonas 2. Credit: AstriumSatellite operator HISPASAT, headquartered in Madrid, will add Amazonas 2 into its fleet of communications spacecraft. The commercial success of the company's Amazonas 1 satellite, deployed in 2004, prompted development of this follow-on powerhouse spacecraft.Amazonas 2 has 25 percent more transponders, 60 percent more power while only having 20 percent more mass than Amazonas 1, Abad said."With Amazonas 2, HISPASAT doubles its capacity over America and consolidates its leadership on this continent," said Petra Mateos-Aparicio, president of HISPASAT."It is a technologically advanced, high performance satellite that allows HISPASAT to increase its range of high quality communications services. With its 64 transponders, Amazonas 2 is the largest satellite with pan-American coverage and it positions HISPASAT as the benchmark satellite operator in Spanish and Portuguese speaking markets."Amazonas 2 will be parked in geostationary orbit at 61 degrees West longitude. It can reach from Alaska to Tierra del Fuego.COMSATBw 1 is the first of two such satellites that will be launched in a program for the German Armed Forces' own military communications architecture.Secure and reliable transmissions via this satellite, plus the sister-craft going up early next year, will enable voice and data relay, video and multimedia broadcasting."Troops in the field will have better connection back to home and within the field. Better connection means higher data rates, more services, better services, more robust communication and greater flexibility," said Ludwig Laux, chief technical officer MILSAT Services, the prime contractor the satellite system.Constructed around Thales Alenia Space's Spacebus 3000B design, the 5,400-pound craft has four super-high-frequency and five ultra-high-frequency transponders. It will be positioned at 63 degrees East longitude. An artist's concept of COMSATBw 1 and 2. Credit: AstriumThe two-satellite network will cover a zone stretching from the Americas to the Far East, providing an independent communications link between the German government, military leaders and their deployed forces. Thursday's launch was the 33rd consecutive success for the heavy-lift Ariane 5 vehicle, including five missions just this year."From the beginning of the year, we have launched seven commercial satellites and two astronomical satellites, Herschel and Planck," Le Gall said.Arianespace's next Ariane 5 rocket has been stacked atop a mobile launching platform in preparation to receive its dual communications satellite cargo -- the SES World Skies' NSS 12 for coverage across the Eastern Hemisphere and Telenor's Thor 6 to serve the Nordic countries. That launch is targeted for October 29.What's more, the rocket slated to fly the year's seventh and final flight has arrived at the launch site from Europe to begin assembly for its December blastoff. "So as you can see, the end of the year is going to be very busy with two other launches...and 2010 will continue at the same pace," said Le Gall.Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is now available in our store. Get this piece of history!STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. Available in our store!Ares 1-X PatchThe official embroidered patch for the Ares 1-X rocket test flight, is available for purchase.Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.Project OrionThe Orion crew exploration vehicle is NASA's first new human spacecraft developed since the space shuttle a quarter-century earlier. The capsule is one of the key elements of returning astronauts to the Moon.Fallen Heroes Patch CollectionThe official patches from Apollo 1, the shuttle Challenger and Columbia crews are available in the store. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Cosmic time machine set for launch into space Thursday SPACEFLIGHT NOWPosted: May 13, 2009Europe is planning to launch a sharp-eyed observatory Thursday to give humans their furthest look back in time to see the cosmic fingerprint of the Big Bang. An artist's concept of the Planck spacecraft. Credit: ESAThe 600 million euro, or $820 million, mission will sharpen cosmologists'understanding of how the early universe transformed from a ball of densehot gas to the formation of complex structures like galaxies and stars."Cosmology is the science that deals with the structure and the contentsof the universe," said Jan Tauber, the mission's project scientist at theEuropean Space Agency. "Planck is quite important for (everyone) who isinterested in the universe that we live in."The Planck observatory will observe the cosmic microwave backgroundradiation left over about 380,000 years after the Big Bang. The CMB isconsidered the first light from the young universe after matter and lightcould exist independently as the universe cooled."Planck is going to take a picture of the universe when it was veryyoung," Tauber said.Scientists estimate the universe is about 13.7 billion years old andformed when a compressed ball of hot matter exploded outward in anunimaginably intense event called the Big Bang."It's like looking at the first day in the life of a human being," Taubersaid.The 4,235-pound spacecraft stands 13.8 feet tall and also has a diameterof about 13.8 feet. It was built by an industrial consortium led by ThalesAlenia Space of France.The mission was named for Max Planck, a German physicist that establishedthe quantum theory, which revolutioned scientists' understanding of atomicand subatomic processes.Liftoff is set for 1312 GMT (9:12 a.m. EDT) Thursday aboard a commercialAriane 5 rocket launched from Kourou, French Guiana.Planck will share the Ariane 5 launch with Herschel, the world's mostadvanced infrared telescope designed to help scientists learn more aboutstar formation and the evolution of galaxies.Herschel will first separate from the Ariane 5, followed by the deploymentof Planck about 28 minutes after launch.The Ariane 5 is boosting the spacecraft into an unusually high orbitstretching to an altitude of more than 700,000 miles. Both payloads arebound to the second Lagrange point nearly 1 million miles from the nightside of Earth, four times past the orbit of the moon.The L2 point is a popular destination for astronomy missions because itwas far enough away from Earth to rid the observatories of interferingradiation, but close enough to allow regular high-band communications withground stations."We can turn our back to the sun, the Earth and the moon and point thesatellite into deep space so it cools down very effectively," Tauber said.L2 is the point where the tug of gravity from the Earth and sun balance,allowing spacecraft stationed there to stay in lockstep with the planet asit circles the sun."There are a lot of advantages of being at L2. It just takes a big rocketto get you there, but we have one so that's OK," Tauber said.Planck will reach L2 about two months after launch and enter a loopingorbit around the point with an average amplitude of about 250,000 miles.The spacecraft's thrusters will be fired to put it on a differenttrajectory from Herschel, which is headed for a larger orbit around L2.Engineers will immediately begin testing Planck's systems after separatingfrom the launcher, but science operations can't begin until the probearrives at L2, according to Thomas Passvogel, ESA's project manager forthe Herschel and Planck missions.It will take 50 days for pressurized helium aboard Planck to cool down theobservatory's detectors enough to begin observations, Passvogel said.Planck's Low Frequency Instrument must be chilled to 20 Kelvin, or about-424 degrees Fahrenheit.The helium must cool Planck's High Frequency Instrument to one-tenth of adegree above absolute zero, the coldest temperature physically possible.NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory provided part of Planck's cooling system,amplifier technology for the LFI unit, and critical detectors for the HFIpayload.U.S. and Canadian researchers are also part of the Planck science team.The agency's investment in Planck totals about $117 million, according toa NASA spokesperson.The instruments must be cold enough to sense warmth from the cosmicmicrowave background in the furthest reaches of the universe, whichaverages about 2.7 Kelvin, or -455 degrees Fahrenheit.LFI's science team is led by researchers in Italy and HFI was provided byscientists led French principal investigators."The cosmic microwave background shows us the universe directly at age400,000 years, not the movie, not the historical novel, but the originalphotons," said Charles Lawrence, Planck project scientist at NASA.Warm sensors would be swamped by hot nearby objects, washing out the coldradiation left over from the Big Bang, according to Tauber.Planck will measure subtle differences in the CMB across the entire sky."The signals we are trying to detect are variations about a millionth ofthe average (CMB) temperature," Tauber said.Officials say Planck will measure the CMB up to the limits of fundamentalastrophysics, obtaining as much information as can possibly be learned bystudying the primordial radiation, according to ESA."Planck is certainly pushing the boundaries," Tauber said."Planck is trying to measure a signal that would be comparable tomeasuring from Earth the natural heat emission of a small animal like arabbit that would be placed on the moon," Tauber said.Although Planck will be gathering incoming light at very low temperatures,the CMB had a temperature of nearly 5,000 degrees Fahrenheit when thelight was emitted.The energy cooled and stretched to longer wavelengths over time becausethe universe is expanding, according to scientists.Planck will collect the light through a mirror with a diameter of 1.5meters, or about 5 feet.Scientists must analyze the images to remove microwave sources within theMilky Way to get a clear picture of the CMB, according to Tauber.The observatory will map the CMB with higher fidelity than its twopredecessors, NASA's COBE and WMAP missions."Planck will give us the clearest view ever of this baby universe, showingus the results of physical processes in the first brief moments after theBig Bang, and the starting point for the formation of stars, galaxies andclusters of galaxies," Lawrence said.Launched in 1989, COBE mapped variations in CMB across the whole sky andearned a Nobel Prize for Physics for two of the mission's scientists.WMAP began observing the CMB in 2001 to create a more detailed map. Theprobe is still operating and returning data.Planck will fill in the rest of the CMB picture. And there is a lot leftto learn, Tauber said."We still have about 15 times more information that we can extract inrespect to WMAP," Tauber said.Planck's instruments also cover a frequency range 10 times larger than WMAP.But WMAP is no slouch.Scientists extrapolated data from WMAP to pin down the age of the universeto 13.73 billion years, accurate to within about 120 million years.WMAP found that dark matter, material not made of atoms, makes up about23.3 percent of the universe. WMAP also confirmed the existence of darkenergy as 72.1 percent of the universe, causing its expansion to speed up."The Planck High Frequency Instrument has a raw sensitivity advantage, soPlanck should significantly improve upon WMAP," said Chuck Bennett, WMAP'sprincipal investigator. "We are expecting great things out of the Planckmission."Planck will build on the legacy of WMAP by helping scientists improvetheir understanding of dark energy and test the cosmology inflationtheory, which states that the universe underwent a rapid, exponentialexpansion a fraction of a second after the Big Bang."In some ways, Planck is a follow-on to other missions and will completewhat they have done," Tauber said. "But it will also yield a lot of newinformation in other areas, and possibly even big discoveries."The observatory could confirm inflation occurred if it can detect B-modes,a type of signal polarization scientists think was caused by ancientgravity from clumps of mass in the early universe."That's considered a very big thing in cosmology nowadays, and I thinkPlanck is the mission that has a chance to detect that," Tauber said.Confirmation of the inflation theory would mean scientists would havetheir first insight into the initial second of the history of theuniverse, which would be a substantial discovery unlike anything before incosmology.Officials expect Planck will begin scanning the sky about three monthsafter launch. Plans call for the observatory to complete at least twoall-sky maps by the end of the mission, which is currently expected aroundthe end of 2010.It may be three or four years before the Planck team is ready to presentthe mission's results, Tauber said.Scientists are waiting to see what Planck learns before proposing anothermission dedicated to observing the CMB."We first have to see what Planck does, and then the picture will be farclearer to see if it's worth trying to design a new mission," Tauber said.Planck was first studied by ESA in 1994, beginning a 15-year journey fromthe drawing board to the launch pad.That wait will be over Thursday, but it will be just the start of a newvoyage back in time for cosmologists and science buffs."Now we just have to wait on the results, but they will be amazing,"Passvogel said.STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. Available in our store!Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is now available in our store. Get this piece of history!Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.STS-133 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Discovery is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-133. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the space shuttle Columbia's historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard's historic Mercury mission with this collectors' item, the official commemorative embroidered patch. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Engineers assess problem aboard Jules Verne craft BY STEPHEN CLARKSPACEFLIGHT NOWPosted: March 9, 2008An electronics box on Europe's first cargo ship shut down a propulsion system command chain responsible for a quarter of the space-age delivery truck's maneuvering thrusters, officials said Sunday."We really don't think it's anything serious, but we're studying itprudently," said Alan Thirkettle, the European Space Agency'sinternational space station program manager. Credit: ESAOfficials stationed in a control center in Toulouse, France, are workingfeverishly to analyze a problem that appeared in one of four sets ofelectronics governing the propulsion system of Jules Verne, the firstEuropean Automated Transfer Vehicle.During the propulsion system's activation sequence moments after reachingorbit, Jules Verne's computers noticed a slight pressure differencebetween the ship's hydrazine fuel and nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer beingfed through valves. The suspect chain controls seven of 28 attitudecontrol jets and one the ship's four main engines, according to NicolasChamussy, ATV program manager for contractor EADS Astrium."This is something we're looking at in a lot of detail now," said JohnEllwood, ATV project manager. "I think the very good news is that all thefailure detection and recovery action all went perfectly. It measured asmall anomaly, immediately went onto the other chain, which is workingperfectly."Jules Verne's main engines are positioned at the back end of thespacecraft, while the smaller thrusters are scattered across the exteriorof the ship.The system is certified to work with three electronics chains, butofficials want the cushion of a backup system, particularly during precisemaneuvers near the space station."There is an off-nominal situation somewhere in one of the four propulsionchains, and that's what we now investigate," Thirkettle told Spaceflight Now.In the meantime, managers ordered controllers to temporarily halt plansfor the vessel's first major engine firing later today. The maneuver wasthe first in a series of burns designed to raise the ship's altitude,culminating in the craft's arrival in a parking orbit about 1,200 miles infront of the station by March 19."We will be a bit cautious now because we're now on a redundant chain, sowe don't want to go on another redundant chain," Ellwood said.ESA and EADS Astrium engineers are devising a plan to reintegrate theelectronics that ordered the switch into the propulsion system's commandstructure over the next few days. Ellwood said he expects the reconfiguredelectronics will help engineers determine what happened in the firstpropulsion chain.The electronics system is designed to turn itself off after switchingchains in case the problem lies within the electronics box itself.The issue could be due to an electronic fault or a problem within a mazeof propellant and helium gas lines leading from Jules Verne's tanks to theship's thrusters, Ellwood said.A command box called Propulsion Drive Electronics, or PDE, controls theextensive network of tanks, pipes, valves, and thrusters."What happened last night was the PDE detected there was some differencein the pressures between the (nitrogen tetroxide) and the (hydrazine),said this is an anomaly, and as planned, the software took over and put itonto the other chain," Ellwood said.If engineers are able to resolve the issue, the chain could be restored tooperational capability after extensive testing, Chamussy said.Officials said engineers have ample time to diagnose the trouble. JulesVerne was to have loitered ahead of the outpost for more than a week towait out the shuttle Endeavour's assembly mission to the complex,scheduled to wrap up with an undocking March 24.Plans then called for the ATV to move toward the station, conducting two"demo days" to check out its rendezvous capabilities before pressing aheadwith docking April 3."We have the 10-day margin before we need to start going into demo days atthe end of the month," Ellwood said.The electronics snafu is the first glitch in Jules Verne's mission, whichbegan smoothly at 0403 GMT Sunday (11:03 p.m. EST Saturday night) withblastoff from the French-controlled spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana.The heavy-lifting Ariane 5 rocket, specially modified for the ATV mission,released Jules Verne at about 0510 GMT (12:10 a.m. EST). Telemetry fromthe nearly 43,000-pound spacecraft confirmed it unfurled its four solararray wings and deployed a critical communications boom within the firstthree hours after launch."We can simulate until the cows come home, but this is the firstopportunity the control team has to work a real off-nominal situation,"Thirkettle said.Additional coverage for subscribers:VIDEO:ARIANE 5 ROCKET BLASTS OFF WITH JULES VERNE VIDEO:ROLLOUT OF ARIANE 5 ROCKET TO LAUNCH PAD John Glenn Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The historic first orbital flight by an American is marked by this commemorative patch for John Glenn and Friendship 7.Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is available in our store. Get this piece of history!Celebrate the shuttle programFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This special commemorative patch marks the retirement of NASA's Space Shuttle Program. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the space shuttle Columbia's historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard's historic Mercury mission with this collectors' item, the official commemorative embroidered patch.Fallen Heroes Patch CollectionThe official patches from Apollo 1, the shuttle Challenger and Columbia crews are available in the store. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Europe dispatches Johannes Kepler to space station SPACEFLIGHT NOWPosted: February 17, 2011 A European robotic resupply spacecraft soared into orbit on an Ariane 5 rocket Wednesday, successfully beginning an eight-day chase of the International Space Station with fresh experiments, crew provisions, oxygen and propellant. The Ariane 5 rocket blasted off at 2151 GMT from Kourou, French Guiana. Credit: Stephane Corvaja/ESAThe Automated Transfer Vehicle lifted off atop an Ariane 5 rocket at 2151 GMT (4:51 p.m. EST) from the French-run Guiana Space Center in South America. Dodging nearby rainshowers and thunderstorms, the 16-story launcher quickly vaulted into a cloudy sky just after sunset.The launch was a day later than planned because an erroneous measurement in the Ariane 5's liquid oxygen propellant system triggered an automatic hold in the countdown Tuesday.No significant glitches occurred in Wednesday's countdown, and the rocket's Vulcain 2 main engine ignited at 2150:55 GMT (4:50:55 p.m. EST), ramping up to nearly 300,000 pounds of thrust. Seven seconds later, after a computer-run health check of the launcher, the Ariane 5's twin solid rocket boosters ignited with an explosive thud to push the vehicle into the sky and northeast from the South America coastline.The Ariane 5 rocket deployed the ATV payload in space 64 minutes later over the Tasman Sea between Australia and New Zealand. The rocket released the 44,000-pound spacecraft, the heaviest payload ever launched by Ariane, right on the mark in a nearly perfect circular orbit 160 miles above Earth."This exceptional launch was the 200th for Ariane, and therefore marks a particularly important step for European space," said Jean-Yves Le Gall, chairman and CEO of Arianespace, the commercial operator of the Ariane rocket family. Astronauts on the International Space Station took advantage of some fortuitous orbital mechanics to snap pictures of the Ariane 5 rocket ascending from the jungles of French Guiana. Italian flight engineer Paolo Nespoli sent back two photos from the lab's cupola module."We usually see an Ariane launch from the ground, but this time we have pictures from yet another perspective, in space," said Jean-Jacques Dordain, ESA's director general. ESA astronaut Paolo Nespoli took this picture of the Ariane 5 launch from the space station. Credit: NASA/ESAChristened Johannes Kepler after the famous German astronomer and mathematician, the 33-foot-long spacecraft deployed its four solar array wings about 25 minutes later. Arranged in an X-shaped pattern, the solar panels stretch 73 feet across and began charging the ship's batteries as planned, according to the European Space Agency.The cylindrical spaceship also activated its GPS satellite navigation system and deployed a communications antenna to exchange data with the space station during docking, according to Nico Dettman, ESA's ATV program manager.It is the second flight of Europe's ATV system, which was started in 1995 to help pay for ESA's share of the space station's operating costs. The agency spent about $2 billion developing the high-tech spacecraft, and each mission costs about $600 million.ESA plans up to seven ATV missions through about 2017. The first ATV flight, nicknamed Jules Verne, successfully demonstrated the craft's design in 2008. The next European resupply freighter is due to launch in February 2012."ATV Johannes Kepler is inaugurating our regular service line to the ISS," said Simonetta Di Pippo, ESA's director for human spaceflight.The automated cargo craft has a series of orbit-raising and rendezvous engine burns planned over the next week, leading to a docking with the space station's Zvezda module Feb. 24 at about 1046 GMT (10:46 a.m. EST).The space station docking is scheduled just hours before the launch of space shuttle Discovery, which is targeting blastoff for 2150 GMT (4:50 p.m. EST) the same day.Despite initial reports the ATV's launch delay this week would postpone Discovery's flight by a day, a NASA spokesperson Wednesday said the shuttle could still lift off Feb. 24. NASA managers will make a formal decision on Discovery's launch date Friday in a flight readiness review. Artist's concept of the ATV approaching the space station. Credit: ESAThe station station is in the middle of a jam-packed manifest of visiting servicing and assembly missions.A Russian Progress unmanned resupply craft launched to the outpost last month and another Progress is slated to leave this weekend. Japan's H-2 Transfer Vehicle, similar in size to the ATV, arrived at the station Jan. 27, and the shuttle Discovery will bring an Italian stowage module to the lab next week."This launch takes place in a crowded and changing manifest for the ISS access, with HTV, Progress, ATV and the shuttle coming and going," Dordain said.The ATV will be the biggest space station resupply craft after the shuttle's retirement, placing it in a crucial role to keep the lab operating. It has the ability to feed rocket propellant, water and oxygen into the space station, plus haul dry cargo such as experiments and provisions for the outpost's residents.Once the space shuttle is retired later this year, the station will rely on a mixed fleet of logistics vehicles for cargo needs. NASA is partnering with SpaceX and Orbital Sciences Corp. to develop commercial resupply capsules expected to be operational by early 2012.The Johannes Kepler mission carries about 3,500 pounds of dry cargo in its pressurized cabin to be manually unloaded by the astronauts and cosmonauts aboard the space station. About 1,875 pounds of maneuvering propellant and 220 pounds of breathing oxygen will be transferred through plumbing from the ATV to the Russian segment of the complex.Another 14,475 pounds of rocket fuel inside the spacecraft will guide the ATV to the space station and boost the lab's orbit by up to 25 miles this spring.John Glenn Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The historic first orbital flight by an American is marked by this commemorative patch for John Glenn and Friendship 7.Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is available in our store. Get this piece of history!Celebrate the shuttle programFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This special commemorative patch marks the retirement of NASA's Space Shuttle Program. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the space shuttle Columbia's historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard's historic Mercury mission with this collectors' item, the official commemorative embroidered patch.Fallen Heroes Patch CollectionThe official patches from Apollo 1, the shuttle Challenger and Columbia crews are available in the store. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.European spacecraft to put cold eyes on the Universe SPACEFLIGHT NOWPosted: May 13, 2009The largest space telescope ever launched is set to begin its journey into deep space Thursday, penning the first chapter of a three-year mission that will peer deep into unseen cold and distant parts of the universe. An artist's concept of the Herschel spacecraft. Credit: ESAEurope's Herschel observatory, a massive spacecraft more than two decadesin the making, will give scientists their best look yet into how new starsand galaxies form and evolve through billions of years.It all begins Thursday with a scheduled launch at 1312 GMT (9:12 a.m. EDT)aboard a commercial Ariane 5 rocket based at Kourou, French Guiana, alongthe northeast coast of South America.The 7,500-pound spacecraft will ride into space with Planck, another ESAobservatory designed to map the primordial universe.Herschel will be deployed first, separating from the Ariane 5's upperstage 26 minutes after liftoff. Planck will follow about two-and-a-halfminutes later.The observatory is shaped like a tube, standing nearly 25 feet tall andstretching almost 15 feet across. Thales Alenia Space of France led a teamof industrial contractors from 17 countries that built the spacecraft.The spacecraft is named for William Herschel, the German-born Britishastronomer that discovered Uranus and infrared radiation.The telescope's three instruments will look into far infrared lightwavelengths never before studied, allowing the sensors to see through dustclouds and deep into star-forming regions across the Milky Way and othergalaxies."I like to say that if you want to understand the life of a star you makea comparison with the lives of people," said Goran Pilbratt, Herschel'sproject scientist at the European Space Agency.Observatories like the Hubble Space Telescope that detect visible lightcan see "adult" stars and most infrared instruments can take pictures of"child" stars, Pilbratt said.But Herschel will be able to see much more, thanks to a suite of high-techdetectors and a perfectly-crafted primary mirror spanning three-and-a-halfmeters, or about 11.5 feet, in diameter."We're going to see the embryos, the ones that are not born yet. We'regoing to see right into the wombs where stars are born," Pilbratt said.Stars form inside relatively cool clouds of dust and gas that hide stellarincubation from normal telescopes designed to magnify what could be seenby the human eye."The birth of new stars takes place in these very optically opaque cloudsof dust and gas," said Paul Goldsmith, NASA's Herschel project scientist.Infrared telescopes like Herschel can see through the enshrouding cloudsto see condensing gas and dust before stars can flicker to life."That's what I think is going to be most exciting, to really be able toget this almost unblocked, highly detailed view of what's going on insidethese clouds," Goldsmith said.Herschel is sensitive enough to even see star formation in other galaxies.Another objective of the mission is to take a census of forming stars inour galactic neighborhood.The observatory will look far back in time to study how galaxies formedand evolved up to 10 billion years ago, during the first three billionyears after the Big Bang."Galaxies evolve by the formation of new stars, especially massive starsthat then die and explode as supernovae and enrich galaxies with heavyelements. They put so much energy out that they really dominate thestructures of these galaxies," Goldsmith said.Scientists will also focus Herschel's telescope on debris clouds aroundother stars to learn more about how planetary systems form.Closer to home, Herschel will help astronomers create highly-detailedchemical maps of objects in the solar system. The observatory will usespectrometers to probe the composition of comets, which scientists believeharbor the frozen building blocks of the solar system.NASA contributed critical detecting equipment, electronics and other keytechnologies to two of Herschel's three instruments, boosting theirobserving capability.A NASA Herschel Science Center has also been established at the CaliforniaInstitute of Technology's Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, whichalso oversees data gathered by the agency's Spitzer Space Telescope.NASA's contributions are valued at $272 million, including spacecrafthardware and operational costs, according to an agency spokesperson.The total cost of the Herschel mission is quoted at 1 billion euros, ornearly $1.3 billion in current exchange rates. That number equates toabout 1 million euros for each day of Herschel's primary mission, Pilbrattsaid.The cost also includes figures for the construction of the spacecraft,science instruments, the launch vehicle and projected operations.Scientists began studying a mission like Herschel in the early 1980s, butit has taken nearly three decades to go from white papers to the launchpad.Industrial production of the observatory, then called the Far InfraredSpace Telescope, began in 2001."I know people who have been dreaming about this since the 1970s and Ihave myself been working full time on Herschel since 1991, which is muchlonger than industry has been on the job," Pilbratt said.NASA later joined the mission to add technical expertise and broaden thebase of researchers that will use the telescope.Herschel's 11.5-foot-wide primary mirror, the largest ever flown in space,is made of silicon carbide, a ceramic material with properties similar toglass.Engineers at Astrium in Toulouse, France, assembled the mirror from 12segments after machining, polishing and coating the pieces.Herschel's mirror has a collecting area of about 100 square feet, around15 times larger than NASA's Spitzer observatory. Herschel's mirror isnearly four feet wider than the mirror on Hubble."Our mirror is much larger, which will enable us to not only collect moreenergy but to see much sharper at these wavelengths," Pilbratt said.The primary mirror and a secondary mirror will focus incoming light into afocal plane inside the cryostat, an insulated vacuum flask that providescooling to ultra-sensitive detectors to a fraction of a degree above thecoldest temperature possible.The telescope design is relatively simple, but it relies on exotictechnologies that must withstand a wide range of temperatures and theintense vibrations of launch, according to Pilbratt.Herschel will launch with 2,300 liters, or about 607 gallons, of cryogenicliquid helium to chill the telescope's coldest detector to a temperatureof 0.3 Kelvin, or below -459 degrees Fahrenheit.The detectors must be subjected to such frigid conditions to see faintemissions of cold objects scattered in the distant universe. Herschel willdetect light from material as cold as -441 degrees Fahrenheit.Herschel's instruments come from scientists in 18 countries, includingEuropean states, the United States, Russia, China, Canada, and Taiwan.The Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer and the Spectral andPhotometric Imaging Receiver, respectively called PACS and SPIRE, willcapture images in a wide swath of the electromagnetic spectrum rangingfrom infrared to submillimeter wavelengths.Both instruments can take pictures and slice infrared light into itsspectral components, like the colors of a rainbow. This capability willhelp scientists remotely determine what chemicals are present inHerschel's celestial targets.A third instrument, called the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared,will obtain revolutionary new information about the composition and motionof star-forming regions, galactic nuclei and interstellar gas.Scientists measure infrared light wavelengths in microns, a unit equal toone-millionth of a meter.Herschel will observe light in wavelengths from about 55 microns to nearly700 microns, according to Pilbratt.Spitzer, today's standard-bearer in infrared astronomy, can resolvewavelengths from 3 microns to about 160 microns."Where Spitzer leaves off, that's where Herschel is just getting going,"Goldsmith said. "We're looking at even longer wavelengths, which means wecan see even better into these opaque clouds of dust."Herschel overlaps Spitzer in longer infrared wavelengths and the jointNASA and ESA James Webb Space Telescope will supplant Spitzer's coverageof shorter wavelengths in even finer detail."There are not only orders of magnitude improvements for being able to dothe same observations, but there are capabilities on Herschel and Webbthat Spitzer never had even on its best day," said Mike Werner, NASA'sSpitzer project scientist.JWST is also billed as a replacement for Hubble because it is sensitive tooptical and near infrared light. The next-generation telescope will launchin late 2013 or 2014.Spitzer was preceded by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite and theInfrared Space Observatory. Japan's Akari telescope joined the effort in2006.NASA is also developing an airborne infrared observatory called SOFIA tocomplement the Spitzer and Herschel telescopes.The Earth's atmosphere blocks most infrared emissions from reaching thesurface, so astronomers seeking to detect these wavelengths must usetelescopes in the upper atmosphere or in space."When I first started working in infrared, there was a lot of mystic,jargon and stange things that people did in the infrared, limited byeither the atmosphere or by the properties of our instruments," Wernersaid.Scientists have cleared those hurdles by launching satellites and buildingmore advanced sensors.Goldsmith said it is difficult to predict what Herschel will find becauseit is studying an unexplored part of the spectrum."We haven't had ready access to the wavelengths between infrared andmicrowaves before, in part because Earth's atmosphere blocks them fromreaching the ground," Goldsmith said. "Because our views were so limitedbefore, we can expect a vast range of serendipitous discoveries, from newmolecules in interstellar space to new types of objects."Herschel will spend at least three years watching the cosmos from a postat the second Lagrange point nearly 1 million miles from the night side ofEarth.The L2 point is the location where the gravitational pull from the sunbalances with the tug from Earth.It is a popular destination for deep space observatories because it ispositioned away from natural interference from the Earth, but still closeenough to allow high bandwidth communications between spacecraft andground stations.The Ariane 5 rocket will boost Herschel into an unusually high trajectorystretching beyond the orbit of the moon.It will take Herschel about two months to drift away from Earth and becaptured by L2, where it will enter a looping halo orbit with an averagediameter of about 1 million miles.Officials plan to start activating Herschel and testing its systemsimmediately after launch. Early science observations can begin as soon astesting ends and Herschel opens the door covering the telescope'scryostat, allowing the instruments to cool down."When we first open the cryostat cover, we still have a lot of things todo before we really start doing science," Pilbratt said. "We will be ableto at least start making some nice pictures at that point, so that we havesomething to show."Routine observations should begin about six months after launch, aftercommissioning and performance verifications, according to Pilbratt.Officials have already allocated observing time for the first 18 months ofthe mission for scientists to study the solar system, star-forming regionsand other galaxies.Herschel will also take a deep field image of a dark part of the sky tosee galaxies in the early universe. These observations, similar topictures taken by Hubble, will reveal important information about theevolution of galaxies.NASA scientists have received about one-third of the observing timereleased so far, officials said.Officials will grant researchers more access to the telescope throughoutits mission. Scientists from Herschel's instrument team are guaranteedabout one-third of the total observing time, and the rest will be releasedto the worldwide scientific community.Plans call for Herschel to offer about 7,000 hours of science time per year.Herschel's observations program is managed by officials at the mission'sscience center in Spain. Mission operations will be conducted from theEuropean Space Operations Center in Darmstadt, Germany.Although Herschel's primary mission is approved for three years, thespacecract carries enough liquid helium to cool its instruments for up tofour years.Scientists envision operating Herschel until the helium runs out tomaximize the mission's scientific return."We have an observatory whose lifetime is limited by something that isboiling away constantly, so we will endeavor to waste as little time aspossible," Pilbratt said.STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. Available in our store!Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is now available in our store. Get this piece of history!Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.STS-133 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Discovery is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-133. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the space shuttle Columbia's historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard's historic Mercury mission with this collectors' item, the official commemorative embroidered patch. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Europe's automated cargo ship docks with space station SPACEFLIGHT NOWPosted: February 24, 2011 Europe's second Automated Transfer Vehicle firmly docked to the International Space Station Thursday, delivering fresh equipment, rocket fuel and oxygen to the orbiting lab hours before space shuttle Discovery was scheduled to blast off with even more supplies. Credit: ESANamed for Johannes Kepler, the German astronomer and mathematician, the ATV arrived at the aft port of the station's Zvezda service module at 1559 GMT (10:59 a.m. EST) after a multi-hour rendezvous sequence."With this smooth docking, Johannes Kepler proves to be a great example of the wave of innovation 'made in Europe,'" said Simonetta Di Pippo, head of the European Space Agency's human spaceflight program. "We are more ready than ever to head into an era of autonomy in space exploration."Docking occurred as the vehicles flew near the coast of Liberia in western Africa.Navigating with relative GPS satellite technology and a futuristic laser system, Johannes Kepler approached the space station Thursday morning, stopping occasionally at preset hold points for engineers on the ground to evaluate the mission's progress.The spacecraft appeared from darkness during a dramatic orbital sunrise, looming large with flashing lights just behind the space station. Resembling a Star Wars X-wing fighter, Johannes Kepler glided to a smooth docking about 10 minutes later than planned.The space station crew reconfigured a video overlay computer inside the Zvezda module to allow them to better monitor the ATV's approach, resulting in the brief delay.Hooks and latches engaged a few minutes later to firmly attach the Johannes Kepler spacecraft to the station, clearing the way for the shuttle Discovery to blast off Thursday at 2150 GMT (4:50 p.m. EST).Discovery's dark orange external tank was already filled with more than 500,000 gallons of liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen propellants at the time of the ATV's docking, but NASA was withholding final approval for the shuttle launch until the European mission safely arrived.Space station managers didn't want the ATV docking while Discovery is also at the outpost, but the successful arrival Thursday means there will be no such conflict.Officials worldwide have been carefully managing hectic schedules aboard the space station in recent weeks. Besides the ATV and the space shuttle, Japan's H-2 Transfer Vehicle is delivering cargo to the complex. Smaller Russian Progress freighters have also been coming and going.The space station crew will open up the 31-inch-wide passageway between the ATV and Zvezda Friday, beginning several months of cargo transfers between the supply ship and the orbiting lab.The second of at least five European Space Agency cargo ships, Johannes Kepler blasted off Feb. 16 aboard an Ariane 5 rocket from the Guiana Space Center on the northeastern coast of South America. The spacecraft traveled over eight days and 2.5 million miles to catch up with the space station. Artist's concept of the ATV's laser rendezvous sensor system. Credit: ESAESA developed the ATV to help pay its share of the space station's operating costs. Each mission costs about $600 million, according to European officials.The Automated Transfer Vehicle will be the largest resupply ship for the space station after the shuttle fleet is retired."This is very important for us and for all our partners in the ISS program since, after the withdrawal of the space shuttle, ATV will be the largest servicing vehicle left to support the Station and it is our responsibility to deliver a proper service," Di Pippo said.Europe is weighing modifying the ATV to return experiments and other cargo from the space station to Earth."Thanks to its flexibility, we can think of a wide variety of new space vehicles," Di Pippo said. "ATV could evolve into a future reentry spacecraft to support future orbital infrastructures and exploration missions, carrying people and supplies to lunar orbit."Built by Astrium, the ATV measures 32 feet long and nearly 15 feet wide. Its four solar array wings stretch more than 70 feet across. Four main engines and 20 smaller thrusters guide spacecraft in orbit."The ATV is a tangible proof of the technologically sophisticated space systems that Astrium, as a truly European company, can provide," said Alain Charmeau, CEO of Astrium space transportation. "Our teams in Germany and France worked together in perfect harmony, supported by superb suppliers all around the continent. We are very proud that the fully-automatic docking procedure -- the highlight of the mission -- passed off without a hitch."The Johannes Kepler mission carries about 3,500 pounds of dry cargo in its pressurized cabin to be manually unloaded by the astronauts and cosmonauts aboard the space station. The pressurized supplies include about 1,400 pounds of crew equipment, 1,300 pounds of hardware components and spare parts, 210 pounds of experiment parts, 100 pounds of laptop computers and related supplies, and 60 pounds of spacewalk gear, according to NASA.About 1,875 pounds of maneuvering propellant and 220 pounds of breathing oxygen will be transferred through plumbing from the ATV to the Russian segment of the complex.The ATV's thrusters will burn more than 10,000 pounds of its own fuel to maintain the station's orientation in space and boost the lab's orbit by up to 40 kilometers, or about 25 miles, later this spring.Johannes Kepler is currently scheduled to depart the space station June 4 and plummet back into Earth's atmosphere with a load of trash and refuse. The spaceship and its new cargo of garbage will burn up over the Pacific Ocean.Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is now available in our store. Get this piece of history!STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. Available in our store!Ares 1-X PatchThe official embroidered patch for the Ares 1-X rocket test flight, is available for purchase.Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.Project OrionThe Orion crew exploration vehicle is NASA's first new human spacecraft developed since the space shuttle a quarter-century earlier. The capsule is one of the key elements of returning astronauts to the Moon.Fallen Heroes Patch CollectionThe official patches from Apollo 1, the shuttle Challenger and Columbia crews are available in the store. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Europe's cargo ship docks to space stationSPACEFLIGHT NOW
Posted 09/19/2014

Message From: Ray Hope   |   Email Address: rayhope2013@hotmail.com
Job Tittle: Personal Assistant needed Work From Home Online Full time / Half time position available From either Home or your current office Compensation: $700 Weekly Duties includes; Typing documents, print and file documents needed in hard copies, process files using copier and fax machines, mail out letters via FedEx, UPS or USPS, run errands following instructions which will be provided you. You will be provided with the items listed below for the job; Microsoft Office Home Business 2013. Dell XPS M2010 Laptop. HP Flatbed All in One Printer, scanner, fax copier Note: You are not going to pay for this out of your pocket i will handle all cost of purchase. IF INTERESTED EMAIL ME WITH YOUR DETAILS IN THE BELOW FORMAT; Full name: Address: City: State: Zip code: Phone number: Textable cell#: Email address: If interested make sure to have your details forwarded to me asap. Regards Ray Hope
Posted 06/07/2014

Message From: Trish Dean   |   Email Address: pdean@elmore.rr.com
Greetings from sunny but cold Alabama! Looking forward to being home the end of May 2014 for a short visit. A former member of BBC, Larke Beverwyk, lost her oldest brother to a heart attack recently. If anyone remember Larke and would be willing to minister to her, she is at Brookcrest Nursing Home in Grandville.
Posted 01/06/2014

Message From: ????? ??   |   Email Address: xezzum@gmail.com
I wish to show my respect for your kind-heartedness giving support to those who need assistance with the issue. Your personal commitment to passing the solution all around was particularly important and have frequently enabled most people like me to reach their goals. This warm and helpful guideline can mean a whole lot a person like me and somewhat more to my fellow workers. Many thanks; from all of us.
Posted 12/13/2013

Message From: toms outlet online   |   Email Address: gzipdxfmqmv@gmail.com
I admire the valuable information and facts you provide inside your articles. I will bookmark your weblog and also have my youngsters examine up here often. Im very sure they will learn a lot of new things here than anyone else!
Posted 08/21/2013

Message From: Beverly Walsh Polmanteer   |   Email Address: alnbev@hotmail.com
7/30/13 Good Morning, have been browsing your site. Very good, informative, and positive. We are so happy to see Berlin Baptist thriving with the wonderful Christian attitude that was present when we were members many years ago. Our love for BBC has never waned and if the Lord is willing I want to visit on October 6th when I am in Michigan. Unfortunately, due to ill health, Alan will not be able to join me. Looking forward to seeing all the 'old timers' and their families! May God Bless each and every one of you! In His Glory and Service, Bev
Posted 07/30/2013

Message From: Missy   |   Email Address: bluejays@tx.rr.com
Thank you for all you do, to serve God, and help people,you are truly a blessing. Missy
Posted 06/25/2013

Message From: don lampen   |   Email Address: firelamp55@yahoo.com
would like info on your church, beliefs etc.. thanks
Posted 03/16/2013

Message From: Kristen Kelling   |   Email Address: Kkelling92@gmail.com
Hello. I know I attend this church, but I didn't even know this was here.
Posted 02/01/2013

Message From: dee boris   |   Email Address: sallys1girl@yahoo.com
I am going to be moving to the Allendale area in the next few weeks and am looking for a baptist church to attend. I am currently a member of New Richmond Baptist Church, lead by Pastor Frank Senters, who I have also asked to help me find an area church. You can either contact me via email or Pastor Senters 616-546-9142. Thank you. God Bless...
Posted 02/23/2012

Message From: keijo   |   Email Address: k.leppioja@hotmail.com
let us enjoy for victory in the spirt for the walls of jericho will fall down when we will fight against this wrong stronghold in every the city suffer for sin and for darkness , so in Jesus name let the be revival and out pouring of the Holy Spirit around the world ,thanks and bless,keij osweden
Posted 10/21/2011

Message From: Phil   |   Email Address: Philbc@yahoo.com
Please Pray my soulmate has already been prepared for me and I have already been prepared for my soulmate.Pray GOD unites me and my soulmate together real soon.Never been on a date or ever had a girlfriend and been Praying and hoping for this for at least 18 years...Prov 13:12 Hope deferred maketh the heart sick, but when the desire cometh, it is a tree of life... Please Pray GOD Blesses me so i can Bless others in every way every day of my life.Pray I can help people who are targeted by every kind of evil 100% of the time.Pray GOD Blesses me to be able to expose evil 100% of the time and evil will not be able to hide once exposed.Pray a hedge of protection around mind body and soul. Pray GOD overflows me with HIS Power,HOLY SPIRIT and Presence in my life. Pray the HOLY SPIRIT is so strong in my life that satan and his servents will flee with terror because GODS presence is so strong in my life. Pray my body would be a strong vessel for the HOLY SPIRIT. Pray GOD causes satan and those used by satan great confusion when they come against me with their evil plans and Pray GOD sends His angels to to fight along side me when is happens.Pray GOD cuffs me in His Hand when evil comes against me.Pray GOD raises me lightyears above satan and those used by satan to glorify GOD.Pray GOD watches over me at all times.Pray GOD takes away all my fear and increases my faith.Pray GOD heals my body completely.Pray all the people that have seen my Prayer Requests in past years will be reminded to Pray for my Prayer Requests again.Pray all the people who saw my Prayer Requests in the past years will have it put it in their hearts and minds to Pray for my past Prayer Requests again...In JESUS Name Amen...Thanks for your Prayers...
Posted 09/14/2011

Message From: TARbSySYrXZDnh   |   Email Address: rosacruzchapeco@hotmail.com
Sounds great to me BTHWIDK
Posted 05/18/2011

Message From: Barbara Buskard   |   Email Address: Vbuskard@aol.com
Hi everyone, doing really well, missing everyone. May the Lord Bless and may you have a Blessed Thanksgiving. The Lord is SO GOOD.
Posted 11/21/2010

Message From: Stephen Dean   |   Email Address: bcjldean@msn.com
I have many fond memories at Berlin Baptist. Great to see the website. Check out mine if you get a chance "bebckent.org" That is Kent, Alabama.
Posted 08/26/2010

Message From: Christi Lee Clark   |   Email Address: clarkncats@yahoo.com
Hello, I am interested in attending your church. Would it be best to come the first time to an evening service? Thank you, Christi Clark
Posted 06/20/2010

Message From: stacy joy vankoevering   |   Email Address: stacarooski@yahoo.com
hey guys!!! i like the new site a lot!! we gotta get more pictures i think though. :)
Posted 03/01/2010

Message From: Nick   |   Email Address: Nick-Noel@att.net
This website is awesome! I like all the options.
Posted 01/26/2010

Message From: Stan Kirk   |   Email Address: 2014wkirk@jpsstudents.org
HI
Posted 01/21/2010

Message From: Sara S   |   Email Address: skalandissg@hotmail.com
Hey, guys this website is cool It deafinitly gives more info on every thing :)
Posted 10/25/2009

Message From: Jason Silverthorne   |   Email Address: jason.silverthorne@gmail.com
I like the new website makeover and the podcast feed. Nice job!
Posted 07/05/2009

Message From: Renee   |   Email Address: rmnottawa@aol.com
Everything is so easy to navigate. I like it!
Posted 06/09/2009

Message From: Sue A. Hunt   |   Email Address: sahunt@aol.com
This is looking great. Thanks Pastor Tim. I was wondering - Bible Study starts in Genesis which is probably good. However, is there a way to move to another book/chapter with out moving one at a time? I like to skip around sometimes!
Posted 05/13/2009

Message From: toad   |   Email Address: tjbuskard65@sbcglobal.net
Hey Berlin team ,the web site looks very good : ) , nice job.It would be nice if u could click on the sermon and listen to it and still navigate around the site.When I tried the sermon stop. I didn't down load it,I thought maybe it would play like wayfm ,once u started the player u could go to other parts of the web site ?.
Posted 05/13/2009